About Me

Biography

Eric (Ric) Redman was born in 1948 and grew up in Seattle, the youngest child of a lawyer and a civic leader.  As a scholarship student he was educated at Phillips Academy (Andover), Harvard College, Oxford University (as a Rhodes Scholar), and Harvard Law School.  

 

He began writing for newspapers and magazines in high school and college, and wrote the nonfiction best-seller The Dance of Legislation at age 23 after serving as an aide to US Senator Warren G. Magnuson (D-WA).  Nearly 50 years later, that book is still in print.  For five decades he has continued writing for newspapers, magazines, law reviews, and as a contributor of chapters to books edited by others.

 

Meanwhile, from 1975 through 2007, he also worked as a lawyer in the electric power sector in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska, and for the Trans Alaska Pipeline System.  Beginning in 2001, he began focusing on the climate impacts of the energy system, and eventually became CEO of Summit Power Group, an independent developer of climate-friendly power plants, including wind, solar, and carbon capture projects.  He and his wife helped sponsor the first scientific research expedition to study the climate impacts of soot (black carbon) in the Arctic.

 

Since 2014 he has worked as a consultant and lawyer for climate-friendly technology companies, and as a Senior Policy Fellow for Deep Decarbonization at the University of California San Diego’s graduate School of Policy & Strategy, where he also helps teach a graduate course on Real World Problems of Energy & Environment.  His board memberships include the Northwest African American Museum, Earth Talk, and the Global Carbon Capture & Storage Institute.  He chairs the Global CCS Foundation.

 

In the early 1980s, he fell in love with the Big Island of Hawaiʻi, its people – including his wife’s Native Hawaiian relatives – and its history.  He and his wife owned a home on the South Kohala Coast of the Big Island for twenty years, where he assembled a library of Hawaiian history.  

 

When his brother in law Tom Wales, an Assistant United States Attorney, was murdered in Seattle in 2001, Redman began writing Bones of Hilo for catharsis and escape.  It took twenty years to bring the book to fruitition.  Its release date in hardback, Kindle, and audio book editions by Crooked Lane Press is June 8, 2021.

Eric Redman sitting on chair

(Author photo by Karen Ducey)

(The murder scene in Bones of Hilo)

My Work

Bones of Hilo

Coming Soon June 2021

bones of hilo book
Mystery and Suspense Magazine
Mystery and Suspense Magazine
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A compelling book, filled with lots of Hawaiian details and intrigue.
Tim Zagat
Tim Zagat
Founder of Zagat Surveys
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Hard to put down — more plot twists than a whole library of Sherlock Holmes.
Chris Knopf
Chris Knopf
Award-winning Author of the Sam Acquillo Hamptons Mysteries
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Combine a deep dive into the history of Hawiian culture with a taut mystery, an anguished, ethnically-fraught love story and clever police procedural, and you have it all with Bones of Hilo.
Karl Marlantes
Karl Marlantes
Bestselling Author of Matterhorn
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In Bones of Hilo, Ric Redman does for Hawaii’s beauty and culture what Tony Hillerman did for the Southwest and the Navajo. Redman creates unique and interesting characters, all the while spinning out a delicious puzzle that, in the tradition of all great mystery writers, keeps the reader guessing right up to the end. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this fine detective novel.
Dick Lilly
Dick LillyPost Alley
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Bones of Hilo brings out the personal and group conflicts arising between the preservation of Hawaiian culture and the overwhelming forces of development and tourism.
Kirkus Reviews
Kirkus Reviews
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Fast-paced . . . Fascinating and timely.
Jonathan Moore
Jonathan Moore
Edgar and Hammett Award-nominated Author of Blood Relations
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Fast-paced and smart, Bones of Hilo is both alluring and dark—much like its Big Island setting. By diving far beneath the glossy shimmer meant for tourists, Eric Redman has surfaced with a fantastic tale of the greed and passion that have written Hawaii’s history, and which will drive its destiny.
Charles Ardai
Charles Ardai
Award-winning Author of Fifty-to-One
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Lush, smart and adult, this is crime fiction of a very high order.
Sarah Stewart Taylor
Sarah Stewart Taylor
Author of The Mountains Wild
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In Bones of Hilo, Eric Redman introduces a compelling new detective protagonist in Kawika Wong. The vibrant and carefully drawn Big Island Hawaiian backdrop, clever and intricate plot, and cast of memorable characters—including the complicated and plucky Wong—make it a must-read!
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From Hawaii’s Big Island to the wilds of Washington’s North Cascades, a novice detective uncovers a hoard of ancient secrets at the heart of a grisly murder.

 

A young detective from Hilo on the wet, working-class side of Hawaii’s Big Island, Kawika Wong faces a battle to gain the respect of his more seasoned colleagues. And he has a great career opportunity when Ralph Fortunato, the Mainland developer of an unpopular resort in South Kohala on the island’s dry and touristy side, is found murdered on a luxury golf course, an ancient Hawaiian spear driven through his heart. 

 

With other detectives desperately trying to solve another string of grisly killings, Captain Terry Tanaka sends his half-Hawaiian protégé Kawika to investigate. As Kawika joins forces with his Hawaiian father and girlfriend to read the cultural signs and make sense of the ritualistic murder scene, they uncover a cache of secrets reaching far back into the Island’s ancient past – and well beyond the Island itself. The San Francisco journalist who finds the body has her own attractions for Kawika, and her own theories about Fortunato’s demise – but do they line up with the evidence?

On a perilous journey that stretches from the Big Island to the North Cascades of Washington and back, Kawika and those around him find danger at every turn. He still has much to learn about history and lies, loyalty and betrayal, truth and fiction, race and revenge, and even about Hawaii itself, both old and new. And he’d better learn it fast, because his instincts and skills may not be enough for him to catch a savvy killer who’s determined to catch Kawika first.

"The best mysteries draw you in with plot and suspense, and stay with you through their vivid characters and the new cultures, eras, and corners of the world they open to you. As you begin Bones of Hilo, the authorities are reeling from the implications of an extraordinary murder. When you reach the end, you’ve been immersed in their investigations—but have also learned about revenge versus forgiveness, loyalty versus betrayal, the parts of history that are known versus those that are repressed, and the ever-changing contours of race. This is a book that will stay with you."

— James Fallows, bestselling co-author of Our Towns

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The Dance of Legislation has long been considered a classic description of the legislative process. In it, Eric Redman draws on his two years as a member of Senator Warren Magnuson’s staff to trace the drafting and passing of a piece of legislation ― S.4106, the National Health Service Bill ― with all the maneuvers, plots, counterplots, frustrations, triumphs, and sheer work and dedication involved. He provides a vivid picture of the bureaucratic infighting, political prerogatives, and Congressional courtesies necessary to make something happen on Capitol Hill. In a Postscript to the 2000 edition, Redman reflects on how that process has, and has not, changed in the thirty years since the book was first published.

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Mr. Redman maintains that ALCOA was a straightforward statutory construction case in which the meaning of the relevant provisions of the Northwest Power Act was clear. He asserts that ALCOA simply affirmed congressional intent.

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There are several reasons why the Bonneville Power Administration uses combination service rather than firm power service to meet the DSI top quartile demand: (1) if properly designed, combination service can provide adequate power quality for this portion of the DSI demand; (2) environmental impacts and costs to non-DSI consumers would be greater if firm resources, planned and installed for other loads, were increased by the amount of the DSI top quartile; and (3) although combination service imposes costs on the DSIs in the form of periodic interruptions, it saves money for all BPA customers by permitting BPA to take advantage of certain physical features of the Columbia River power system that would otherwise impede rather than facilitate efficiency. These policy reasons are simple; the operational details of combination service are not. Because combination service is complex it is poorly understood, the cost savings it provides the Northwest are in danger of being lost.

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About ME

Eric (Ric) Redman is a Seattle-based writer, lawyer, and climate activist. He is a former contributing editor of Rolling Stone and has written for the New York Times, Washington Post, and many other publications. He also wrote the non-fiction bestseller The Dance of Legislation.

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bones of hilo book

From Hawaii’s Big Island to the wilds of Washington’s North Cascades, a novice detective uncovers a hoard of ancient secrets at the heart of a grisly murder.

Read More

Copyright 2020